let-me-see-you-strippped:

you know how hard it is for me to shake the disease that takes hold of my tongue in situations like thes. let-me-see-you-strippped:

you know how hard it is for me to shake the disease that takes hold of my tongue in situations like thes. let-me-see-you-strippped:

you know how hard it is for me to shake the disease that takes hold of my tongue in situations like thes. let-me-see-you-strippped:

you know how hard it is for me to shake the disease that takes hold of my tongue in situations like thes.

let-me-see-you-strippped:

you know how hard it is for me to shake the disease that takes hold of my tongue in situations like thes.

hallow—girl:

Fuck

calvinharris on Instagram

moonlightsonataaw:

depeche-mode-devotee:

Awwwwww

Yes He’s the best
depechemodenl:

Happy Birthday Depeche Mode with your single ‘Strangelove’ released on 13|4|1987, 27 years ago !
'Strangelove' was the 1st single for the then upcoming album ‘Music for the Masses’. The original version of “Strangelove” is a fast-paced pop track. Though successful, this did not seem to fit with Music for the Masses’s darker style, so Daniel Miller (Mute Records) made a slower version that became the album version. Alan Wilder (Recoil), in the Q&A section of his Recoil website, writes that the band felt the single version was “too cluttered” and was the reason Miller’s remix was commissioned. Miller expounded on this in the MFTM re-master documentary DVD, stating he felt the original single version was too complicated and would benefit from being simplified. It was remixed by production team Bomb the Bass (Tim Simenon) and released again as a single in the USA as “Strangelove ‘88”, finally reaching number 50 on the Hot 100.
There are two B-Sides for “Strangelove”, both instrumental. “Pimpf” is a dark instrumental that is mostly piano, named after the members of one of the HitlerYouth organizations. “Pimpf” later shows up as the final track on Music for the Masses. There is also a remix available on some “Strangelove” single releases called “Fpmip” (“Pimpf” backwards).
The second instrumental is “Agent Orange”, named after the herbicide used in the Vietnam War. At the end of the song, you can hear some morse code. Rumoured to mean “If anybody can hear this, please help me”, it is actually just gibberish (LAXI “.-.. .- -..- ..”, several times repeated). “Agent Orange” later shows up as the first bonus track on the CD/Cassette version of Music for the Masses.
The music video for “Strangelove” was directed by Anton Corbijn and appears originally on the Strange video. The scenery from the vid are locations shot at Paris. There’s also a Corbijn-directed video for “Pimpf”, added exclusive to the Strange video too.
There’s no official release of the Strange Video on dvd, but here’s a link via VIMEO: http://bit.ly/1qTIhEW
Highest Chart Peakings: #1 US Billboard Dance Club Play #2 Germany & South Africa
depechemodenl:

Happy Birthday Depeche Mode with your single ‘Strangelove’ released on 13|4|1987, 27 years ago !
'Strangelove' was the 1st single for the then upcoming album ‘Music for the Masses’. The original version of “Strangelove” is a fast-paced pop track. Though successful, this did not seem to fit with Music for the Masses’s darker style, so Daniel Miller (Mute Records) made a slower version that became the album version. Alan Wilder (Recoil), in the Q&A section of his Recoil website, writes that the band felt the single version was “too cluttered” and was the reason Miller’s remix was commissioned. Miller expounded on this in the MFTM re-master documentary DVD, stating he felt the original single version was too complicated and would benefit from being simplified. It was remixed by production team Bomb the Bass (Tim Simenon) and released again as a single in the USA as “Strangelove ‘88”, finally reaching number 50 on the Hot 100.
There are two B-Sides for “Strangelove”, both instrumental. “Pimpf” is a dark instrumental that is mostly piano, named after the members of one of the HitlerYouth organizations. “Pimpf” later shows up as the final track on Music for the Masses. There is also a remix available on some “Strangelove” single releases called “Fpmip” (“Pimpf” backwards).
The second instrumental is “Agent Orange”, named after the herbicide used in the Vietnam War. At the end of the song, you can hear some morse code. Rumoured to mean “If anybody can hear this, please help me”, it is actually just gibberish (LAXI “.-.. .- -..- ..”, several times repeated). “Agent Orange” later shows up as the first bonus track on the CD/Cassette version of Music for the Masses.
The music video for “Strangelove” was directed by Anton Corbijn and appears originally on the Strange video. The scenery from the vid are locations shot at Paris. There’s also a Corbijn-directed video for “Pimpf”, added exclusive to the Strange video too.
There’s no official release of the Strange Video on dvd, but here’s a link via VIMEO: http://bit.ly/1qTIhEW
Highest Chart Peakings: #1 US Billboard Dance Club Play #2 Germany & South Africa
depechemodenl:

Happy Birthday Depeche Mode with your single ‘Strangelove’ released on 13|4|1987, 27 years ago !
'Strangelove' was the 1st single for the then upcoming album ‘Music for the Masses’. The original version of “Strangelove” is a fast-paced pop track. Though successful, this did not seem to fit with Music for the Masses’s darker style, so Daniel Miller (Mute Records) made a slower version that became the album version. Alan Wilder (Recoil), in the Q&A section of his Recoil website, writes that the band felt the single version was “too cluttered” and was the reason Miller’s remix was commissioned. Miller expounded on this in the MFTM re-master documentary DVD, stating he felt the original single version was too complicated and would benefit from being simplified. It was remixed by production team Bomb the Bass (Tim Simenon) and released again as a single in the USA as “Strangelove ‘88”, finally reaching number 50 on the Hot 100.
There are two B-Sides for “Strangelove”, both instrumental. “Pimpf” is a dark instrumental that is mostly piano, named after the members of one of the HitlerYouth organizations. “Pimpf” later shows up as the final track on Music for the Masses. There is also a remix available on some “Strangelove” single releases called “Fpmip” (“Pimpf” backwards).
The second instrumental is “Agent Orange”, named after the herbicide used in the Vietnam War. At the end of the song, you can hear some morse code. Rumoured to mean “If anybody can hear this, please help me”, it is actually just gibberish (LAXI “.-.. .- -..- ..”, several times repeated). “Agent Orange” later shows up as the first bonus track on the CD/Cassette version of Music for the Masses.
The music video for “Strangelove” was directed by Anton Corbijn and appears originally on the Strange video. The scenery from the vid are locations shot at Paris. There’s also a Corbijn-directed video for “Pimpf”, added exclusive to the Strange video too.
There’s no official release of the Strange Video on dvd, but here’s a link via VIMEO: http://bit.ly/1qTIhEW
Highest Chart Peakings: #1 US Billboard Dance Club Play #2 Germany & South Africa
depechemodenl:

Happy Birthday Depeche Mode with your single ‘Strangelove’ released on 13|4|1987, 27 years ago !
'Strangelove' was the 1st single for the then upcoming album ‘Music for the Masses’. The original version of “Strangelove” is a fast-paced pop track. Though successful, this did not seem to fit with Music for the Masses’s darker style, so Daniel Miller (Mute Records) made a slower version that became the album version. Alan Wilder (Recoil), in the Q&A section of his Recoil website, writes that the band felt the single version was “too cluttered” and was the reason Miller’s remix was commissioned. Miller expounded on this in the MFTM re-master documentary DVD, stating he felt the original single version was too complicated and would benefit from being simplified. It was remixed by production team Bomb the Bass (Tim Simenon) and released again as a single in the USA as “Strangelove ‘88”, finally reaching number 50 on the Hot 100.
There are two B-Sides for “Strangelove”, both instrumental. “Pimpf” is a dark instrumental that is mostly piano, named after the members of one of the HitlerYouth organizations. “Pimpf” later shows up as the final track on Music for the Masses. There is also a remix available on some “Strangelove” single releases called “Fpmip” (“Pimpf” backwards).
The second instrumental is “Agent Orange”, named after the herbicide used in the Vietnam War. At the end of the song, you can hear some morse code. Rumoured to mean “If anybody can hear this, please help me”, it is actually just gibberish (LAXI “.-.. .- -..- ..”, several times repeated). “Agent Orange” later shows up as the first bonus track on the CD/Cassette version of Music for the Masses.
The music video for “Strangelove” was directed by Anton Corbijn and appears originally on the Strange video. The scenery from the vid are locations shot at Paris. There’s also a Corbijn-directed video for “Pimpf”, added exclusive to the Strange video too.
There’s no official release of the Strange Video on dvd, but here’s a link via VIMEO: http://bit.ly/1qTIhEW
Highest Chart Peakings: #1 US Billboard Dance Club Play #2 Germany & South Africa

depechemodenl:

Happy Birthday Depeche Mode with your single ‘Strangelove’ released on 13|4|1987, 27 years ago !

'Strangelove' was the 1st single for the then upcoming album ‘Music for the Masses’. The original version of “Strangelove” is a fast-paced pop track. Though successful, this did not seem to fit with Music for the Masses’s darker style, so Daniel Miller (Mute Records) made a slower version that became the album version. Alan Wilder (Recoil), in the Q&A section of his Recoil website, writes that the band felt the single version was “too cluttered” and was the reason Miller’s remix was commissioned. Miller expounded on this in the MFTM re-master documentary DVD, stating he felt the original single version was too complicated and would benefit from being simplified. It was remixed by production team Bomb the Bass (Tim Simenon) and released again as a single in the USA as “Strangelove ‘88”, finally reaching number 50 on the Hot 100.

There are two B-Sides for “Strangelove”, both instrumental. “Pimpf” is a dark instrumental that is mostly piano, named after the members of one of the HitlerYouth organizations. “Pimpf” later shows up as the final track on Music for the Masses. There is also a remix available on some “Strangelove” single releases called “Fpmip” (“Pimpf” backwards).

The second instrumental is “Agent Orange”, named after the herbicide used in the Vietnam War. At the end of the song, you can hear some morse code. Rumoured to mean “If anybody can hear this, please help me”, it is actually just gibberish (LAXI “.-.. .- -..- ..”, several times repeated). “Agent Orange” later shows up as the first bonus track on the CD/Cassette version of Music for the Masses.

The music video for “Strangelove” was directed by Anton Corbijn and appears originally on the Strange video. The scenery from the vid are locations shot at Paris. There’s also a Corbijn-directed video for “Pimpf”, added exclusive to the Strange video too.

There’s no official release of the Strange Video on dvd, but here’s a link via VIMEOhttp://bit.ly/1qTIhEW

Highest Chart Peakings: #1 US Billboard Dance Club Play #2 Germany & South Africa

(via you-shouldbehigher)

totheharlequin:

hallow—girl:

#tbt En route to Coachella weekend 1. So pleased with this thing it’s an absolute minter. Pretty sure the guy had no clue what it was that he was selling. #classicvw #karmannghia photo cred: @leannehainsby

@charlietadman on Instagram

(via suziamazingwoman)

sohi-chan:

Cupcakes for everyone today ♥

sohi-chan:

Cupcakes for everyone today ♥

(via suziamazingwoman)

damageddevotion:

I desperately want to be that microphone stand!!!!

damageddevotion:

I desperately want to be that microphone stand!!!!

the-yolocaust:

when u hear your favorite band in public

image

(via you-shouldbehigher)